Managerial Experience Essay Structure

Management Resume Examples and Writing Tips

Best Resume Samples and Templates for Management Jobs

If you are applying for a management position, your resume needs to show off your management-related skills and experience. In the document, you should strive to demonstrate to potential employers your ability to lead, motivate, and organize those who work below you. 

Always prioritize your information so that the most important facts about you and your career are at the beginning of the resume. For management-related resumes, you may include your management philosophy, examples of accomplishments, and quotes from others regarding your management skills, in addition to your work history and other relevant information.

Below, you'll find detailed information on skills to highlight on your resume, along with management resume examples for a variety of management jobs, including customer service, finance, human resources, operations, technical, and general management positions. Plus, review more tips to help you craft a successful resume. 

Why Management Skills Are Important

Companies need effective managers who can help accomplish the goals and objectives of the company. From human resources to revenue targets, management skills are constantly used on all levels of a company.

Business leaders use management skills to coordinate employee output with third-party vendors, suppliers, and other external companies to reach targeted objectives. Delegating different responsibilities to employees gives workers a sense of worth, teamwork, drive, and the opportunity to learn new skills as each goal is met. 

Some action verbs that demonstrate key leadership skills: Initiated, directed, innovate, originated, guided, coached, led, lead the path, developed, inspired, motivated, established, dominated, achieved, influenced, planned and forecast.

Action words for managerial positions that showed the ability to manage, supervise, and delegate are: Organized, administered, coordinated, supervised, controlled, oversee, managed, took charge of, maintained, handled, assigned, and dictate.

Some suggested titles for the management skills section in a resume, can be titled: Key Skills and Strengths; Core Skills and Competencies; Skills and Qualities; or Skills and Abilities.

Here is more information on management skills. Plus, review management job titles and responsibilities, and browse through a list of leadership skills as well. 

Management Resume Examples

Review these resume examples for inspiration on how to make your management resume the best it can be. Do not copy these samples exactly — instead, use them as a framework to help you develop your own resume that highlights your skills and work experience. 

Resume Types and Templates

Also, review the various types of resumes, including functional, combination, and targeted resumes, as well as resume templates you can download to create your own resume.

  • Combination Resume - A mix of a chronological and functional resume. 
  • Chronological Resume - This type of resume lists experience in order from most recent to oldest. 
  • Functional Resume - In this resume variant, the focus is on relevant skills and experience, rather than a chronological listing of positions held. 
  • Targeted Resume - The focus here is on matching your skills and experience to the job listing. 
  • Resume with Accomplishments Section - Think of this section as a place to show off your greatest hits in the workplace. 

Browse free resume examples that fit a variety of employment situations. These sample resumes and templates provide job seekers with examples of resume formats that will work for almost every job seeker. 

How to Create a Professional Resume

Just getting started with your resume? Get the lowdown on how to create a professional resume, from choosing the right type through proofreading the document.

Once you have a strong resume ready, your next step will be to create a cover letter — review these ​management cover letters to help get started. 

More About Resume Writing ​

Build a Resume in 7 Simple Steps

The following essay was submitted to the Berkeley MBA program by our client. The client was accepted to the program.

One of the most difficult situations I have ever had face during my tenure as VP of my company was the decision whether to fire Jane, an experienced employee, who I had worked with closely for two years. The decision arrived at my desk after a new CEO was appointed, and I became his VP, in charge of most employees. Together, we decided that we were going to transform our small and quiet company into a leading research firm with a target of 50% sales growth over the next 2 years. For that, we needed a devoted team that was committed to this goal.

This vision did not fit Jane. She left a large corporation where she worked long hours, and one of the main reasons she chose to join us was the laid back and relaxed atmosphere of a small company- exactly what we were determined to change. Although talented, she did only the minimum necessary, and was not willing to make any sacrifices and commit to our goal.

I faced a tough decision. On the one hand, firing a talented and experienced employee, in a time when most of the employees were new (as we wanted to drive growth we recruited new people), seemed unwise. In addition, I knew that our relationships with major clients might get hurt and a substantial knowledge base would be lost

On the other hand, not firing her would mean establishing double standards for our employees – most were required to work hard, whereas Jane was leaving early and refused to contribute extra efforts. Her opposition to the change had already begun creating undesired effects, as a few of the employees resented her.

In order to solve the problem, I tried to make Jane relate to the new goals and change her attitude. In addition, we also improved the company’s bonus program, based also on her comments, in order to reward the extra efforts. When all milder measures failed, I had to make a decision.

I decided to fire Jane. Although I knew that in the short run things would be difficult, I concluded there was no other way. I needed the most dedicated team possible, a team who was personally committed to the growth of the company. Jane, as head of a major division, would have undermined this effort in the long run.

Personally, making the decision was very hard. It meant firing someone with whom I had worked with closely for a long time. However, In terms of team spirit, matters improved greatly, and we succeeded in building the right team to lead the company forward. The new division head that replaced Jane was a highly motivated manager, and with her I had a team that could reach the ambitious goals we set, and indeed, in two years we have doubled the company’s project capacity, with a great improvement of research quality and customer satisfaction.

One thought on “Managerial Experience Essay Structure

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *